Saturday, 9 June 2012

Top Technology Inventions - Google Prius

Last year, there are many new amazing inventions are happened in our growing technology world.  Some of the incredible inventions are explained in this post.

Google Prius

Google gives us the power to access the world in matter of seconds. They joined with greatest car manufacturing company Toyota to bring motorized sofas on wheels also known as driverless car. These specially designed Toyota Priuses are the same as the regular Prius (full hybrid electric mid-size car) with the addition of cylinder-shaped sensor (the vehicles eye) attached to the roof. Using artificial-intelligence software that can sense anything near the car it mimics the decisions made by a human driver. 

The aim of this invention is to prevent car accidents. Manufactures ensure that this car can reduce traffic accidents, free-up people’s time and reduce car usage. They act as environmentally-friendly cars.

Seven of these robot-cars have already been tried and tested, and drove more than 140,000 miles with very little human control. These hybrids are not yet for sale and for now, only accessible to its employees.

Image source: fortune


History of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

 History of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Capital : Kingstown
Official language(s) : English


St. Vincent and the Grenadines is an independent state with a stable, democratic government. Formerly part of the British colony of the Windward Islands from 1871 to 1969, it became a British Associated State for 10 years prior to full independence in 1979. The governmental system is based on the British system. English, with a unique Vincentian / British accent is spoken throughout the islands. Before the arrival of Europeans and Africans in the 16th century, various Amerindian groups passed through or settled on St. Vincent and the Grenadines, including the Ciboney, Arawak, and Carib peoples. These groups likely originated in the Orinoco Valley of South America and migrated north through Trinidad and the Lesser Antilles. By the time Christopher Columbus passed near St. Vincent on his fourth voyage in 1502, the Caribs occupied the island after displacing the Arawaks a few centuries earlier. 

Columbus and the Spanish conquistadors ignored St. Vincent and the smaller Grenadine islands nearby, but focused instead on the pursuit of gold and silver in Central and South America. They did embark on slaving expeditions in and around St. Vincent following royal sanction in 1511, driving the Carib inhabitants to the rugged interior, but the Spanish made no attempt to settle the island. The English were the first to lay claim to St. Vincent in 1627, the French would be the first European settlers on the island when they established their first colony at Barrouallie on the Leeward side of St. Vincent in 1719. The French settlers cultivated coffee, tobacco, indigo, corn, and sugar on plantations worked by African slaves.

St. Vincent was granted associate statehood status on October 27, 1969, giving it complete control over its internal affairs. Following a referendum in 1979, St. Vincent and the Grenadines became the last of the Windward Islands to gain independence. It celebrates independence on 27 October 1979.


St. Vincent, chief island of the chain, is 18 mi (29 km) long and 11 mi (18 km) wide and is located 100 mi (161 km) west of Barbados. The island is mountainous and well forested. St. Vincent is dominated by the volcano Mount Soufrière, which rises to 4,048 ft (1,234 m). The Grenadines, a chain of nearly 600 islets with a total area of only 17 sq mi (27 sq km), extend for 60 mi (96 km) between St. Vincent and Grenada. The main islands in the Grenadines are Bequia, Balliceau, Canouan, Mayreau, Mustique, Isle D'Quatre, Petit Saint Vincent, and Union Island.